Would-be second steppers stuck in first homes

Housing market sympathies are often reserved for first-time buyers. But making the second rung of the property ladder can be tougher still, according to Lloyds Bank.

What’s the latest?

Almost a quarter (23%) of first-time homeowners looking to take the next rung of the property ladder – so-called ‘second steppers’ – claim the move is more difficult than getting on the ladder in the first place, according to a survey from Lloyds Bank.

Over a third (35%) of respondents said they will delay having children because of their inability to move, while 12% intend having fewer children than they planned. A further 13% said they were forced to change their career to facilitate the purchase of their next home.

Second steppers are mostly couples and young families moving on from their first-time buyer flats, to houses offering more living space and a garden.

 

Second rung territory?: This four-bedroom family home with a driveway and garage in Crowthorne, Berkshire, is on the market for £585,000

Why is this happening?

More than half (56%) of respondents blamed low interest rates (which makes it difficult to save) for the delay in taking that second step.

And 39% claimed that, because of waning buyer demand, it was more difficult to selltheir current home compared to this time last year. However, only 9% said they would consider lowering the price to attract more interest from potential buyers.

Other culprits were the rise in general moving costs and the cost of stamp duty (which kicks in on homes priced over £125,000).

Collectively, these obstacles meant that 52% of first-time homeowners were being forced to stay put, despite having planned to upsize in the past 12 months.

What sort of home are second steppers looking for?

The dream property among second steppers would be a detached four-bedroom house with garage, driveway and kitchen/diner, according to Lloyds’ research.

But more than a quarter (28%) of respondents were unwilling to compromise on their personal list of ‘must-have’ features. Of those who were willing to make sacrifices, a conservatory would be the first to go, followed by a garage.

 

Second steppers’ dream: A four-bedroom property with large rear garden, double garage and driveway in Milton Keynes for £475,000When quizzed on the type of property they hoped to buy, second steppers typically said they wanted either a period home (35%) or a town-based new build (34%).

Once they’ve made the second rung, respondents plan to spend an average 10 years living in it.  About one-third (31%) envisage they won’t move again.

Top 3 takeaways

  • One-in-four second steppers say it was easier to buy their first home than to move up the property ladder
  • 35% will delay having children because of difficulties in upsizing
  • Second steppers say their dream home is a detached four-bedroom property

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House price growth

The increase left the typical UK home costing £205,846, according to Nationwide

What’s the latest?

House price growth sped up in February with property values climbing by 0.6%.

The increase, which followed a 0.2% rise in January, left the typical UK home costing £205,846.

The annual rate at which house prices are increasing also picked up slightly during the month to stand at 4.5%, compared with 4.3% in the year to the end of January, according to Nationwide Building Society.

Why is this happening?

Nationwide said the housing market continued to be supported by the UK economy, which remained relatively strong.

Economic growth accelerated slightly between October and December, while the unemployment rate remained stable at an 11-year low of 4.8%.

But the group warned the outlook was uncertain, and the economy was likely to slow down during 2017, with consumer spending hit by the weaker pound.

Robert Gardner, Nationwide’s chief economist, said: “Nevertheless, in our view a small rise in house prices of around 2% is more likely than a decline over the course of 2017, since low borrowing costs and the dearth of homes on the market will continue to support prices.”

image: https://st.zoocdn.com/zoopla_static_cms_content_cms_document_assets_(426074).jpeg

Home for sale in Ascot.Above: four-bedroom home on Kings Road in Sunninghill near Ascot 

Who does it affect?

The fact that the heat appears to have come out of the property market is good news for those looking to buy a home as it takes off some of the pressure to purchase somewhere quickly.

But the ongoing shortage of homes for sale continues to be an issue as it limits choice for potential buyers.

The fact that house price growth is expected to slow further may also have an impact on stock levels, as homeowners are more likely to put their homes on the market to ‘test the water’ during periods of strong increases in property values.

Sounds interesting. What’s the background?

Nationwide said there had been a significant increase in the proportion of people buying property with cash during the past decade.

It said cash transactions had soared from just 20% of all purchases in 2005/2006 to around 35% now.

But Nationwide said the rise was driven by a decline in mortgage lending, rather than a jump in actual cash transactions.

Even so, the share of cash buyers has not fallen back as the economy has recovered and lending has picked up again.

The level of people buying with cash peaked at 38.9% in the first quarter of 2016 as investors rushed to complete purchases before new higher stamp duty rates came into force in April.

Top 3 takeaways

  • House price growth sped up in February with property values climbing by 0.6%.
  • The increase, which followed a rise of 0.2% in January, left the typical home costing £205,846.
  • The annual rate at which prices are increasing also picked up slightly during the month to stand at 4.5%, compared with 4.3% in the year to the end of January.

What’s the cost of buying a home ? lets have a look

What’s the cost of buying a home?

buying a houseSo, you’ve spent more time than you care to admit on Rightmove homing in on the ideal area for you to live. You’ve seen one too many floorplans, fallen asleep dreaming of furniture placements and started making colour charts for the prospective kitchen…

 You’ve decided to take the plunge and buy a home so let’s get this show on the road!

The next step is to talk money but, as a first-time buyer, what fees do you need to think about that might not have come to mind yet?

Deposit

This will normally be around 5% – 20% of the property price which you will pay upfront to your solicitor, to secure the property. You want to get together as big a deposit as possible in order to get the best mortgage rates.

Mortgages

You will need to speak to a Mortgage Adviser to find out how much they will lend you. The amount will depend on your salary, the size of your deposit and credit history. If you’re not planning to buy immediately, there are several things you can do to improve your chances of getting a better mortgage i.e. you may get a better interest rate if your credit rating is better.

There are many things to think about when selecting a Mortgage Adviser – such as whether to go through a broker or direct to the lender. Although their rates will be different, it is more important to look at which will support your personal circumstances the best. Regardless of whether you go through a broker or direct, the adviser should be able to present you with a shortlist of options based on your personal situation to make life easier for you when deciding which to go with.

The other fees you can expect to see, at this stage of the process, are mortgage arrangement fees (which you can pay upfront or roll it into your mortgage repayments), mortgage valuation fee, broker fees and conveyancing transfer fee.

Get a step by step guide to mortgages with our Mortgage Hub here.

Stamp Duty

Stamp Duty isn’t just for the millionaires amongst us – it is a charge on any home if the property costs over £125,000. You can see Stamp Duty charges for a particular home price with this calculator here but, in a nutshell, this is how it works:

If the purchase price is £275,000, stamp duty is calculated as follows:

0% on the first £125,000 = £0

2% on the next £125,000 = £2,500

5% on the final £   25,000 = £1,250

Total stamp duty payable = £3,750

Be aware: this is the way stamp duty is calculated if this is your only home, but if it’s a buy to let investment or a second home, different rules apply.

Valuation and surveyor’s fees

The next step is for your mortgage provider to create a mortgage valuation report on the property as a means to check its market value and condition. There are three different report tiers to choose from, ranging from the most basic “Mortgage Valuation”, to the most comprehensive “Buildings Survey”. These may seem like an unnecessary fee, but it’s better to be fully aware of any potential problems you may face in the future with the property, before going any further with the purchase. You will usually be required to pay upfront for the cost of whichever report type you choose. Find out about the three different options below:

Mortgage Valuation – This is required by all lenders and is the minimum level of report required. The report checks that the property‘s cost is in line with current market values, as well as other basic checks.

Homebuyer’s Report – This is a much more detailed version of the Mortgage Valuation. In this report, they will look at all visible aspects of the home and recommend changes as well as any causes for concern. This may be easiest and cheaper if you use the same person who is doing your Mortgage Valuation.

Buildings Survey – This is the most detailed kind of survey. Recommended for older structures, period properties or homes which have had alterations (or which you plan to renovate), the surveyor will look thoroughly for problems with damp, within the roof and structure, rotting or with the foundations etc. They will also provide you will estimate prices for maintenance work.

Remember: when you’ve received your report, don’t just put that onto your pile of paperwork – make sure you read it and understand it thoroughly before you proceed with the home buying process.

Solicitor fees

A solicitor will be needed to help with the legal side of buying a home and may offer other services, such as local searches – which check out if there may be any local plans or issues going on which could affect you as a prospective owner. They will also charge for solicitor fees, disbursements and Land Registry fees – so these fees could rack up. Have a look at this calculator to see what your expected legal fees could be.

It is, again, important to do your research into several solicitors to pick the right one for you. The more expensive ‘no sale, no fee’ option is great for protecting yourself incase the sale falls through or you could get a much cheaper option but you will still have to pay their fees if the process is halted. Also, do you want a local or a call centre-type service? A local solicitor may be slightly more expensive but they may have more local knowledge and you can go in and pester them if you want to push the process along!

And when you’re ready to move…

That’s a blog for a different day, but you’ll need to keep some funds aside for removals companies (use our local removals tool here), ground rent if you’re buying a leasehold flat, the cost of changing the locks and house insurance, once you move.

There may seem like a lot of costs here, but it’s best to know what you’re dealing with and what the options are upfront, so you can make sure you have saved enough before you start and you don’t have to cut corners. It also means you  can do the necessary research and know your options when it comes to picking solicitors and mortgage advisors. Why not print this list off and tick them off as you go along? Good luck with your move!

 

Get your home ready for Christmas

With presents to buy, holidays to organise and food to prepare, it’s easy to neglect your home in the run up to Christmas. As always, we’re on hand to help, so here’s a list of quick fixes to get your home sparkling in time for 25th December.

December 15, 2016

home ready for Christmas

Bring Hygge into your home

  • Embracing the Danish concept of hygge doesn’t have to involve great effort or expense – it’s a Danish term for feeling cosy, spending quality time with friends and finding pleasure in ordinary, everyday moments. So lay out some cosy throws, plump up your cushions and enjoy some time with your loved ones
  • Nothing says homely and cosy as much as a fire or wood burning stove, but mess and hassle is the last thing we want at Christmas. Save yourself time and energy with instant lighting and long-burning wrapped logs. They don’t spit, you won’t need firelighters and you’ll have a roaring fire in an instant.
  • Ensure your heating is working properly – no one wants to be sitting in a cold house with no hot water on Christmas Day

home ready for Christmas

Make room to make merry

  • Declutter surfaces to make room for guests drinks glasses and bowls of nibbles. Let’s face it, you aren’t going to touch the fruit bowl for the next few weeks. Downsize to a small bowl of festive satsumas and make space for the mulled wine and mince pies
  • Simple touches like a candle-lit mulled wine warmer will look lovely when guests come round and help spread the gorgeous smells of Christmas around your home
home ready for Christmas

 

“Before-Christmas-itus”

It’s a mild illness that you’re probably still in the throes of; the obsessions to get that job done before Christmas. While it’s now unrealistic to say you could re-decorate the guest bedroom, you could at least replace those lightbulbs that went 6 months ago before visitors arrive…

  • A quick and easy trick to enhance lighting this time of year is the humble fairy light. Plus, they’re a much safer bet than candles if you’re hosting children or elderly relatives
  • Oil squeaky door hinges, wipe paintwork doors and bannisters and clean the windows, because while we’re wishing for a white Christmas, chances are the low winter sun will be glaring in on Christmas day and showing up how good your window cleaning skills are
  • If you’re still committed to getting that job done beforehand – no matter how big or small – then consider getting some extra help and find a home service professional with Plentific

home ready for Christmas

It’s beginning to smell a lot like Christmas…

  • Stock up on some festive scent diffusers
  • Water your Christmas tree! The last thing you want is to be hoovering up pine needles on Christmas morning. Tending to your tree should also ensure it continues to give off that lovely pine aroma
  • Get rid of any dodgy smells – clean pet beds and purge your fridge / cupboards of old food to make way for Christmas dinner!
  • Give your bathtub, sink and shower a good scrub in advance of planned – and the inevitable unexpected – visitors

home ready for Christmas

A welcoming first impression

  • Tidy up the front of your house so it looks just as good as the interior. While these tips are for home sellers, they’re good ideas that we could all use
  • Leave plenty of time to make up spare bedrooms with clean sheets and towels. It always takes longer than you think, so just set aside a block of time
  • Significantly more house fires happen at Christmas time, so make sure you test smoke and carbon dioxide detectors
  • Hang a festive wreath up on the front door

You’re all set, Merry Christmas!